(Source: item.rakuten.co.jp)

Art by Fukaya Yuichiro, Japan 

Art by Fukaya Yuichiro, Japan 

(Source: shiki-kagrra)

Mikako of Gion.  Apprentice geiko (maiko), Mikako, of the Gion Kobu district of Kyoto, [Japan]. She participated in a dance as part of the Yoiyama festivities on the eve of the 2014 Gion Festival.  Text and photogragraphy by Rekishi no Tabi on Flickr

Mikako of Gion.  Apprentice geiko (maiko), Mikako, of the Gion Kobu district of Kyoto, [Japan]. She participated in a dance as part of the Yoiyama festivities on the eve of the 2014 Gion Festival.  Text and photogragraphy by Rekishi no Tabi on Flickr

(Source: Flickr / rekishinotabi)

iseo58:

window japan

iseo58:

window japan

rumikokoyanagi:

Onna (Woman). , 1971 Akira Satō 

Akira Satō 

japaneseaesthetics:

Water Pitcher.  Wood; lacquerwork.  Early 19th century, Japan.    NationalMuseum of Ethnology, Leiden, the Netherlands .  The extreme simplicity of this pitcher, with, as seen above, hardly any specific treatment nor any adornment, results in something which even today strikes us as a perfect design. Seemingly not misplaced in some exhibition of contemporary Scandinavian design, yet, it dates back from the early decades of the nineteenth century. It is, I would say, that even today, impossible to improve on this red-lacquered water pitcher. The manufacturing and execution are built on a tradition of several centuries: the basic shape consists in a plywood structure to which a wooden handle and spout are attached. This construction is then covered with many layers of lacquer, made from the sap of the lacquer tree, the Rhus vernicifera. Adding green vitriol or acetous ferric oxide to the purified lacquer produces the common black, applied to the inside of the pitcher. The red lacquer used on the outside derives from adding cinnabar or, more likely in this case, colcothar, benigara. In both the black and the red, the lustre of it depends on the quality of the purified raw lacquer.  Text by Prof. Matthi Forrer, curator Japanese arts, Leiden.

japaneseaesthetics:

Water Pitcher.  Wood; lacquerwork.  Early 19th century, Japan.    NationalMuseum of Ethnology, Leiden, the Netherlands .  The extreme simplicity of this pitcher, with, as seen above, hardly any specific treatment nor any adornment, results in something which even today strikes us as a perfect design. Seemingly not misplaced in some exhibition of contemporary Scandinavian design, yet, it dates back from the early decades of the nineteenth century. It is, I would say, that even today, impossible to improve on this red-lacquered water pitcher. The manufacturing and execution are built on a tradition of several centuries: the basic shape consists in a plywood structure to which a wooden handle and spout are attached. This construction is then covered with many layers of lacquer, made from the sap of the lacquer tree, the Rhus vernicifera. Adding green vitriol or acetous ferric oxide to the purified lacquer produces the common black, applied to the inside of the pitcher. The red lacquer used on the outside derives from adding cinnabar or, more likely in this case, colcothar, benigara. In both the black and the red, the lustre of it depends on the quality of the purified raw lacquer.  Text by Prof. Matthi Forrer, curator Japanese arts, Leiden.

Otaru Snow Gleaming (Snow Lantern) Festival, Hokkaido, Japan.  Photography by Christopher Chan on Flickr

Otaru Snow Gleaming (Snow Lantern) Festival, Hokkaido, Japan.  Photography by Christopher Chan on Flickr

(Source: Flickr / chanc)

René Burri, Zen monk meditation. Japan, Kyoto, 1961. Magnum Photos

René Burri, Zen monk meditation. Japan, Kyoto, 1961. Magnum Photos

(Source: magnumphotos.com)

Traditional rooftop.  Japananese 

Traditional rooftop.  Japananese 

(Source: aijiu)

himatsuri:

Niigata, Japan, 2010, Holga 120GN新潟市、日本

himatsuri:

Niigata, Japan, 2010, Holga 120GN
新潟市、日本

japaneseaesthetics:

Formal Stand.  18th - 19th century. Wood; lacquer. Japan.   The stand served to display flower arrangements or incense burners in the tokonoma, the alcove in traditional Japanese houses.   NationalMuseum of Ethnology, Leiden, the Netherlands 

japaneseaesthetics:

Formal Stand.  18th - 19th century. Wood; lacquer. Japan.   The stand served to display flower arrangements or incense burners in the tokonoma, the alcove in traditional Japanese houses.   NationalMuseum of Ethnology, Leiden, the Netherlands 

fishstickmonkey:

Yakushima, Japan.  Photography by Fumihiko Kato  (via FractionMagazineJapan)

fishstickmonkey:

Yakushima, Japan.  Photography by Fumihiko Kato
(via FractionMagazineJapan)

Work by Japanese stylist Katsuya Kamo

Work by Japanese stylist Katsuya Kamo

(Source: totokaelo.com)

bosspic:

梅ヶ香umegaka

bosspic:

梅ヶ香
umegaka

(Source: toranekokenn.6.ql.bz)